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Camp David Co-Working Space at Industry City Is Open for Business

Startups are exciting, like planning a European vacation. Possibilities are endless. A jaunt to Sarajevo from your relaxing poolside manse in Croatia sounds doable. Riding the Frecciarossa from Rome to Milan for a quick day trip? Piece of cake! There and back! Then you find yourself lost in Sutjeska National Park hours from civilization and realize you may have bitten off more than you can chew. 

This is how many startup companies, and I’ll include independent consultants, dive into their new enterprises. Bright-eyed! The world is their oyster.

Then reality strikes. You find out you have to pay to advertise in your local newspaper to actually form a business in New York. The creative team behind your branding and website is weeks late with its deliverables. Your first big order of bespoke tote bags fell through. The costs are always higher, processes more complex, people more difficult. And without a home base—aside from your actual home—to keep spinning all the various plates startups need to spin, you become overwhelmed. 

This is where Camp David, a new co-working space at Industry City in the Sunset Park area of Brooklyn, comes in. Camp David is an oasis within an oasis, with mid-century décor that serves the single-desk startup or the dozen-person incubator equally well. 

The location is key. Industry City has become a diverse and accessible hub of innovation, creativity and networking. The food court boasts some of the best fare in Brooklyn; courtyards serve sunbathers and working groups alike; and dancing and live-music events are held seemingly every other day. Camp David clearly saw the wave of interest and individuals involved in this local boom, and is filling a very real void. It is a stylish, affordable co-working and meeting space for Brooklyn’s creative classes and professionals to operate around like-minded folks in a comfortable environment.

As you enter the sprawling first-floor space off 36th Street between highway overpass and harbor, there are several defined areas for each style of worker: a mini-bullpen of desks to your immediate right backed by a smartly curated 20-foot bookcase with low library lighting; cafe seating just beyond for the casual meet-and-greet; and long, mid-century mod couches for late-afternoon strategy sessions, which were popular among some of the early adapters to Camp David.

A long bar in the back serves patisserie and cold brew in the A.M. and proper drinks in the P.M. Conference rooms of varying sizes run along a wall of windows overlooking a neatly manicured courtyard with picnic tables perfect for lunch in the sun. Chet Baker, Beach House and the like layer in just the right amount of color to the typical co-working white noise. 

On a recent day, a nearby table hosted an Orthodox man sipping tea with a colleague speaking in Hebrew. Another group took over a six-top to discuss strategy around an app-based startup.

On another day, a Brooklyn resident who runs a family olive company based in Tunisia was talking with a colleague in Sousse about his next shipment. A weekly newspaper publisher consulted on an upcoming piece of reporting. Makers worked in the lower level of Camp David on new designs. Writers zoned out with earbuds in, sipping on cortados. Meetings ran in the glass-walled, but still private, conference rooms.

The scene is diverse— suits mixed with runway alongside denim and tattoos. These are the people you want to be around, in the environment you have been searching for months to find.

For more information and to sign up visit TheCampDavid.com. 

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